SMG Review: Taylor DN3 Sapele/Spruce Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar

Taylor DN3 Sapele/Spruce Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar

TAYLOR GUITARS

As an 18 year old, Bob Taylor began working at American Dream building guitars for owner Sam Radding, where Kurt Listug was already an employee. When Radding decided to sell the business in 1974, Taylor, Listug, and Schemmer bought American Dream and renamed it the Westland Music Company. Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.” Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible for the design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment…

As of 2008, Taylor Guitars has more than 550 employees. The factory is located in El Cajon, California with worldwide distribution.

OFF THE RACK

The first thing I noticed about the Taylor DN3 was that Taylor tone, the sound of quality. The DN3 Guitar is a great beginning solid-wood Taylor guitar. The DN3’s back and sides are made of Sapele with a Sitka spruce top to create a rich tone and resonance.

The DN3 has phenomenal bass, crisp mid’s and bright highs that will have you singing even the most simple of progressions. Some of the DN3 features include a bound ebony neck, chrome plated tuners, and an Indian rosewood headstock overlay. Simple, traditional styling and renowned Taylor craftsmanship make this a classic guitar that is ready to put on a show. While it does not utilize electronics, the volume does not suffer one bit. The neck feels powdery and smooth with amazing action. The DN3 felt a little big but nothing that hindered playing. I was surprised with how easy it was to tune the DN3, getting near perfect intonation was very user friendly… something we all can appreciate.

THE SPECS

Body Style: 6-String dreadnought
Back & Sides: Sapele
Top: Sitka Spruce
Neck: Tropical American Mahogany
Fretboard: Ebony with Binding
Fretboard Inlay: Small Pearl Dots
Headstock Overlay: Indian Rosewood
Binding: Cream Plastic
Bridge: Ebony
Nut and Saddle: Tusq
Tuning Machines: Chrome Plated Taylor Tuners
Scale Length: 25 1/2″
Truss Rod: Adjustable
Neck Width at Nut: 1-3/4″
No. of frets: 20
Fretboard Radius: 15″
Finish: Satin with Gloss Top

THE LOW DOWN

Overall this is a great Taylor guitar with all the trimmings that you have come to expect from Taylor Guitars. The tone of the DN3 is beautiful to say the least, with its deep bass and crisp mid’s and articulate highs. You will be simply amazed as the sound resonates through this fantastic guitar. Depending on your style, you might find the lack of a cutaway difficult to reach the higher frets, but it’s not that bad if you have long fingers. While this particular guitar might feel bulky, it fits nicely in the lap. The action is great, having the strings not too far off the fretboard but not super close, giving you added string control. I like the adjustable truss rod added to the DN3 as weather can really do a number on these guitars if left to sit for long periods of time. Definitely a great performing acoustic guitar, check one out for yourself you might be surprised with what you hear.

 

Pros: Light weight, Truss rod, Great tone, Simple, Classic Taylor feel.

Cons: N/A

Till next week, thanks for reading and keep on shredding!

 

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  • Oh that’s why it’s called Dreadnought!
    Too bad, I don’t have that long fingers. So overall, is it good for beginners? What can you advise? Thanks for the review by the way! 🙂

  • Oh that’s why it’s called Dreadnought! Most probably because of the size…

    And too bad, I don’t have that long fingers. So overall, is it good for beginners? What can you advise? Thanks for the review by the way! 🙂

  • How’s it going. The dreadnought was a larger style non cutaway design most companies utilize. Its just a style thing. The length of the fingers seems like a relevant concern in the beginning but given time your fingers will stretch out and you will be able to reach farther away both up and downwards and across the neck. so don’t be worried about finger size. I have tiny hands as well and there isn’t a guitar out there that i can’t get the job done on. Just give it time 🙂 This would make a killer first guitar.It’s easy to play and the action is low so it will feel comfortable. You might want to try a single cutaway and compare the reach of the higher frets before you buy a guitar though. Sometimes when starting out cutaways are more comfy on the body and you can reach higher frets is easier. Hope this helped out. If you have any other questions feel free to ask away my friend. Cheers!

    Nick
    SMG

  • Hi Nick,
    Thanks for the advice! It truly does help that you cleared that out. 🙂 I’ll keep your points in mind!

    Thanks so much, once again. Cheers!

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