Building a Band Bond Stronger than Duct Tape!

Fight For Your Right To Bond

Many aspiring guitarists move past the daily regimen of bedroom boot-camp to go fight victoriously in the real world of ROCK BANDS!!! Finding and forming that band and preparing for the battles ahead is no small task of it’s own, but the real secret to a winning band of rockers is to build a bond that will last.

Often, we just get so caught up in the rush of excitement with each show that we tend to forget that we are part of a team and each member carries the same weight within the unit. By working to build a bond between band mates early on, you are respectfully working together collectively to express your talents, making everything you do so much more expanded and infused with energy plus it all transfers over to the ears of the listener!

Dude, You Rock!

There are many ways to build a band into a brotherhood or sisterhood and just honestly caring about the other person can make a huge difference. It’s not the drummers fault that he had 26 pieces of gear to load in and outta the van and you have your axe and a modeling amp and that’s it! Give the man a hand and see if anyone else needs a hand with something. After all, once you graduate up to a refrigerator sized rack of gear, you’ll need a hand too! Also complimenting elements of the show that you liked is a great way to boost band morale! Everyone is a bit self-conscious of how they just performed so it’s nice to know your ‘homies’ were watching when ya done good!

I’ve Got Your Back Man!

Respecting each others space is also very important and has a few different meanings as well. First, it’s important to grant your band mates a certain amount of personal space. An example here is in the rehearsal room. Don’t be a space hog, work to create a balance of symmetry across the room, instead of making sure you have enough room to showboat and do the windmill! Another example would be when traveling in a van, be courteous of the others around you. When you pack 4-8 people with little sleep in a van and drive them over bumpy roads for 5 hrs, things can tend to annoy you quickly, so being courteous to your friends may rub off on them as well. The other aspect of granting space is to do so creatively. It’s great to help your band mates grow, but be sure not to butt in too far when it’s not necessary. Often, each guy or gal will favor their own tones, set-up, etc. so make suggestions lightly and don’t come off like you know it all.  Also keep in mind that creative people are often stifled when others suggest too many things before they’ve had a chance to really express their full idea. Being patient enough to hear everyone’s ideas played out will assure you the same attention gets paid to your input!

The bottom line is that when your in a band, you all need each other and have to have each others backs all the time. Too many good bands end over petty arguments and inflated egos and you, the elite readers of Share My Guitar are much too wise for such rubbish to bring down your band!

Can’t We All Just Get Along

So go down to the rehearsal spot, give your bassist two more inches of floorspace for his amp, tell your drummer his cymbals are shining like a freshly waxed Camero, and tell your singer that you totally know he can still sing as bad ass as Bruce Dickenson, and watch your band transform before your very eyes!

Scott “SVH” Von Heldt is a staff writer for SMG. Scott is currently the lead guitarist for Brian “Head” Welch (ex-Korn) and has worked with members of White Zombie, Cirque Du Soliel and many others. In late 2008 he released the first book of his Mystic Art of Self-Discovery series entitled Mind Over Metal: The Musician’s Guide to Mental Mastery.

Email: SVH@sharemyguitar.com

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